Recognized as one of the ten best wilderness lodges in the world by Outside Magazine.

Travel to the lodge requires that you fly into Iquitos, Peru. From Iquitos we take you by boat up the mighty Amazon River, for a distance of about 50 miles, then up the Tahuayo tributary, another 40 miles.

The trip takes 4 hours by our speedboat. Amazonia’s main lodge on the Tahuayo River is not a resort, nor a hotel, but a jungle lodge, comfortable for adventurous travelers. There are fifteen cabins; some are honeymoon cabins, with a king-size bed, others are cabins with two beds and a few are family style cabins with one large bed and several single beds. Half of the cabins now have new private bathrooms. The other half of our cabins have shared bathrooms. Cabins with private bathrooms are assigned on the basis of earliest reservation.

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Each cabin is raised above the jungle floor on stilts and is connected to other buildings of the lodge by a raised boardwalk. Other buildings include a modern kitchen built to the highest standard of sanitary food preparation, dining hall, areas to socialize and relax and a conservation education laboratory with library. The modern flush toilets and showers use a sanitary septic system. The water used in the plumbing comes from a well rather than water pumped from the river, which is typical of most jungle lodges. There is some electricity provided by solar panels and batteries, so guests can recharge camera batteries or use CPAP machine. Lighting is provided by soft LED lights rather than the more dangerous kerosene lamps used in most other lodges. Satellite based phone, internet, and e-mail service are available.

MEALS:

The food is prepared by a culinary staff and is considered by our guests as delicious. Special diets can be entertained with prior notice. We have much experience in sanitary food and water handling and preparation and thus you can eat anything served at the lodge, even salads and unpeeled fruit, items that are not generally recommended for consumption by tourists in South America.